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Miss Nicha Sato (2nd year doctoral student) of the Photonic Device Science Laboratory was awarded the best poster presentation award at The Joint International Conference on Applied Physics and Materials Applications & Applied Magnetism and Ferroelectrics

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Miss Nicha Sato of the Photonic Device Science Laboratory won the best poster presentation award at a conference held in Pattaya, Thailand, on December 1-4, 2021. alone student from each of the 15 sessions in the forum received an award. Awards were given to 27 excellent students out of 175 poster presentations.



Nanoparticulate Modified Microelectrode for Neurotransmitters Detection by Fast-scan Cyclic Voltammetry

Nicha Sato, Makito Haruta, Yasumi Ohta, Hironari Takehara, Hiroyuki Tashiro, Kiyotaka Sasagawa, Oratai Jongprateep, and Jun Ohta



I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Prof. Ohta and Asst. Prof. Haruta for their kind support and very helpful advice in my research. Also, I would like to extend my sincere thank you to all members of the Photonic Device Science Laboratory for their constant support. Receiving this award is a great honor which encourages me to continue my research.

This study has developed metal oxide nanoparticles as the electrochemical sensor for dopamine and acetylcholine detection. The microelectrodes with metal oxide nanoparticles were applied onto a flexible polyimide substrate for performance evaluation in vitro and in vivo. Microelectrode has prepared by mixing metal oxide nanoparticles hematite iron oxide (Fe2O3) and copper oxide (CuO), and MWCNTs were undergoing hydrothermal. The electrochemical performances of modified microelectrodes were evaluated by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry which was conducted in dopamine and choline acetate. The modified microelectrode observed a linear response of dopamine and acetylcholine with high sensitivity. This new modified detector can offer outstanding opportunities to overcome drawbacks in conventional detectors and promise to integrate with the CMOS imaging sensor.


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