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Mr. Prom Kantuptim (a D2 student)of the Applied Quantum Physics Laboratory received Poster Presentation Award at the The Joint International Conference on Applied Physics and Materials Applications & Applied Magnetism and Ferroelectrics (ICAPMA-JMAG-2021)

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At The Joint International Conference on Applied Physics and Materials Applications & Applied Magnetism and Ferroelectrics (ICAPMA-JMAG-2021) on December 1-4, 2021, held at Pattaya, THAILAND, Mr. Prom Kantuptim (2nd year doctoral student) of Applied Quantum Physics (formerly Sensing Device) Laboratory received the poster presentation award from the conference committee. The award was given to 27 outstanding posters from all poster presentations at the conference.

[From left to right, Prom Kantuptim, Associate Professor Noriaki Kawaguchi]



Optical and scintillation properties of Ce-doped Y2Si2O7 single crystal

Prom Kantuptim (D2), Daisuke Nakauchi (Associate Professor), Takumi Kato (Assistant Professor), Noriaki Kawaguchi (Associate professor), Takayuki Yanagida (Professor)

I would like to present my sincere gratitude to professor Yanagida and the applied quantum physics laboratory staff for academic support and guidance throughout this project and my study at NAIST. This presentation abroad during the pandemic couldn't happen without heavy assistance on the document procedure from the secretary of the applied quantum physics laboratory as well as the international student coordinator of division of materials science. I am highly hopeful that this presentation is not just the regular international conference presentation, but the beginning of the international friendship and cooperation between Japan (NAIST) and Thailand (Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science) on the luminescence and scintillation materials field. Finally, I would like to share this award with my friends at the applied quantum physics laboratory and all NAIST students who do their best effort during this difficult time of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ionizing radiation has been crucial for modern civilization, from the academic to the commercial scale. Compared with low-energy photons such as visible light, a more complicated and specific device is needed to harness the benefits of ionizing radiation to its full potential. A scintillator, a sub-category in the luminescence materials, can convert ionizing radiation to ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. This study has the aim to be one of the first reports on Ce concentration dependence of photoluminescence and scintillation properties on Ce-doped Y2Si2O7 single crystal. One of the notable results is the excellent scintillation light yield of Ce-doped Y2Si2O7. With all the investigated properties in this study combined, the Ce-doped Y2Si2O7 is becoming one of the candidates for a novel scintillator material for γ-ray detectotions.

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